Tag Archives: Hunter’s River

A wind as from the mouth of a furnace

On 15 May 1828 the Monitor in Sydney reported:

The weather for the last two days has been remarkably warm, the thermometer having stood at 84 on Monday at noon. On the evening of the same day it reached 80 at nine o’clock at night, a hot wind having set in from the N. W. How this can be accounted for we know not, as the hot winds have never been known to prevail after April. The weather just now is altogether unprecedented. But it is an unprecedented Country altogether—natural, moral, political, and religious.

On 12 November of the same year, the Sydney Gazette reported:

One of those sudden squalls which are of such frequent occurrence in this part of the world, visited Sydney, on Saturday last. The forenoon of the day was peculiarly sultry, with a dense atmosphere, the heaviness of which was only disturbed by an equally disagreeable hot wind, which cast a glare upon the face of nature, not very dissimilar to that which proceeds from the mouth of a furnace.

The furnace analogy recurs in John Dunmore Lang’s description, in his Historical and Statistical Account of New South Wales, of the effect of hot winds in several districts of New South Wales in 1828. The drought had been interrupted by ‘a copious and seasonable fall of rain’ in the upper parts of Hunter’s River and elsewhere. The wheat crop revived and an abundant harvest was expected. But there was a sudden change in the settlers’ fortunes (pp. 209-210):

Just, however, as the wheat had got into the ear, a north-westerly wind, blowing as if from the mouth of a furnace, swept across the country, and in one hour destroyed many hundred acres of highly promising wheat.

The Monitor 15/5/1828, p. 5. Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser 12/11/1828, p. 2. John Dunmore Lang, An Historical and Statistical Account of New South Wales, from the Founding of the Colony in 1788 to the Present Day, 4th ed., vol. I, London, Sampson Low, Marston, Low, and Searle, 1875, pp. 209-210.